Come, Holy Spirit: Confirmation Retreat

By: Vania Dienzo

A few months ago, a brother in Youth Apostles reached out to the Women Youth Apostles to see if we had any availability to help at the various confirmation retreats and workcamps in the upcoming spring and summer months. With my sister Tiffany’s encouragement, I signed up to be a cabin leader for the first All Saints Girls Confirmation Retreat March 24-25, hoping to get better ideas on activities and structure for my own confirmation students as a catechist. I had never been on this particular retreat before or even had a retreat for my own Confirmation formation so I didn’t know exactly what to expect that weekend. Although I was anxious going into it, I am now very grateful I was able to attend the retreat and to serve alongside four of my Women Youth Apostle sisters.

It had been a while since I’d done relational ministry outside of my own parish in Maryland so I was nervous to meet new middle school teens, have 10 of those teens in my particular care and in my small group, and to also give one of the retreat talks. God showed me that I really didn’t need to be nervous! Though my group wasn’t very open at the start, as we progressed through the meals and activities the girls would share more and we could talk more and more easily over the short period of time we had on retreat.

A small group of girls participate in a scavenger hunt activity

Unsurprisingly, the Holy Spirit was a major theme in the retreat! One of the main activities is a scavenger hunt, where teens rotate through various stations, each representing a gift of the Holy Spirit the 8th graders could expect to receive in a new way at Confirmation. I led the station on Knowledge. I could tell the girls already knew so much about the life of Jesus and were open to learning more about the Faith through our discussion. When it came to time for my talk on Saturday afternoon titled “Our Sin and God’s Mercy”,  I still was nervous,  but  right before my talk I prayed to the Holy Spirit to remember my notes so I could share with the girls about one of my my favorite parables about the Father’s mercy, The Prodigal Son, and my own experiences. When I talked, I only needed to check my notes a few times. I could see the girls were listening intently and one of the girls even volunteered bravely for a short demo. I would consider all this the work of the Holy Spirit stirring up my own gifts!

Vania gives her talk, “Our Sin & God’s Mercy” to the 8th grade girls

 

The rest of the retreat was inspiring and moving, even from my perspective as a leader. To hear more questions on sin, see all the retreatants go to the sacrament of Reconciliation willingly and then kneel in Adoration was beautiful. It was also a great joy to pray a rosary with students leading decades and talk about our Blessed Mother on the Feast of the Annunciation.

Another moving part for me was when Rob, the All Saints Director of Youth Ministry, talked to the entire group about community and being involved in different ministries in high school. He led some of the girls through a trust exercise, and I began to tear up when they successfully executed it because it was scary but awesome! I was even more impacted when the high school assistant leaders shared their experiences in CLC (a Catholic Life Community that two of my sisters lead with two other adult leaders), Theater Ministry, Youth Group, etc. They were all wonderful examples of the fruit our ministries can bear and how community is important in our faith lives.

Rob Tessier speaks to the girls about the importance of community in living our faith

 

Overall, the retreat was a great experience led by the Holy Spirit.  It was beautiful to witness young girls learn, pray and interact with each other in our beautiful Catholic Faith. It was also amazing to serve alongside my Women Youth Apostle sisters who are all so naturally great in leading, speaking and getting to know the girls. I felt very blessed by God to be there with  all of them. This retreat definitely reminded me of how much I love our Faith and how much I love sharing it with young people. As a first time confirmation Catechist at my parish, I have more ideas now on how next year’s retreat and class activities can be like. I would recommend catechists and youth ministry volunteers stretch themselves to try out retreats like this one, to discover their gifts and to see how the Holy Spirit might use these to reach the hearts of young people.

Accompanying Teens in Prayer, Charity, and Evangelization

This month’s formation meeting will conclude a six part series on the process of evangelization. The foundation for this series was laid in August with a presentation on “The Mission of the Church.” It gave an overview and introduction to the process of evangelization according to the mind of the Church.

The subsequent sessions have focused on a particular stage in the process of evangelization and drawing out, on a practical level, what these different essential moments look like in youth and campus ministry today.FID

Much of what will be covered during this series will be supplemented by reading Sherry Weddell’s book Forming Intentional Disciples. As the upcoming topic for each month is introduced we will note sections from this book that correspond with the topic.

This month’s formation is called “Accompanying Teens in Prayer, Charity, and Evangelization” and will be presented by Lindsay McDermott on February 28, 2017. We will begin with Mass and Evening Prayer at 7:30pm.

The full list of topics in the series are as follows:
1. The Mission of the Church (Overview)
2. Relational Ministry and Building Trust with Teens (Pre-evangelization)
3. Apologetics (Pre-evangelization)
4. Proclamation of the Gospel through Personal Testimony (Evangelization)
5. Delivering the Fullness of the Faith (Catechesis)
6. Accompanying Teens in Prayer, Charity, and Evangelization (Discipleship)

Post-meeting update (3/1/17): Lindsay was able to share FOCUS’ vision for discipleship and spiritual multiplication. She encouraged us to look ways we can live this out in community and in ministry. Click here for an overview from FOCUS of the path to becoming a spiritual multiplier. What would it take for us to have this kind of impact in youth ministry?

The Morning Star: A reflection on the Epiphany

By: Lilie Graybriel 

For most of us, the start of a new year sparks up old memories and gets us thinking about what new memories the future has in store for us. Some people even reach a moment of epiphany, gaining a whole new outlook on life or starting to see someone or something in a new light. Recently, one of my students asked me to explain to them the Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord; and naturally, I turned to Google for some help answering.  I found that the word “epiphany” comes from the Greek verb meaning “to reveal.” As I explained to the curious young lad what we were celebrating, I couldn’t help but reflect on those the moments when God reveals Himself to mankind, in particular, through Christ’s birth.

The Gospel yesterday speaks about how God revealed Himself to the Magi through the Star of Bethlehem (Matthew 2:1-12).  We are told that the Magi have followed a rising star in search of the newborn King of the Jews. Unaware of the true significance of this kingship, they follow the star to the future King of Israel after King Herod sends them to search for the child in Bethlehem. Upon seeing the star stopped above Jesus and his mother, Mary, the Magi are immediately filled with joy and kneel before him with gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.

With this in mind, I couldn’t help but reflect on the appearance of stars in scripture, especially since they made in appearance in my prayer before the Blessed Sacrament just a few weeks ago, and again in a priest’s homily during Mass the very next day. Even from the beginning of time, God created stars to act as a revelation of His glory to mankind.

Genesis 1:15 says the stars “serve as luminaries in the dome of the sky, to shed light upon the earth.”

In Psalm 8:4-7, “When I see your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars you set in place, what are mere mortals that you care for them? Yet you made them little less than a god, crowned them with glory and honor.” We are able to reflect on the greatness of God’s creation and how much more He cares for us than even the beauty of the His night sky.

In 2 Peter 1:19, we are reminded to heed the words of the prophets until the day God reveals this message to us as “the morning star arises in your hearts.”

Not mention the perfect revelation in the Book of Revelation! Verse 22:16 reads “I, Jesus, sent my angel to give you testimony for the churches, I am the root and offspring of David, the bright morning star.”

How could he possibly be anymore clear in revealing himself there?

 
But, Jesus isn’t the only person of the Bible referred to as the morning star. In fact, it’s even one of many star-related names given to His Mother, Mary. Star of the Sea, Star of Purity, Our Lady of the Star, and even Our Lady of Light are all titles given to Mary. Not to mention the countless visions of Our Lady surrounded by light, wearing a crown of stars. Just as she does in artistic depictions of her as the Queen of Apostles.

Mary is the guiding light for each of us, always pointing the way to Christ, just as the Star of Bethlehem did for the Magi. However, she is so much more to us than just a mentor or a guide. She shows us the way to be true disciples of Jesus Christ. She’s our spiritual and universal mother.

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In John 19:26– 27, we are told “When Jesus then saw His mother, and the disciple whom He loved standing nearby, He said to His mother, “Woman, behold, your son!” Then He said to the disciple, “Behold, your mother!” This wonderful gift of Mary as our mother comes from God, himself, as he’s dying on the cross for us. There have been countless times in my faith where I feel so distant and lost in my faith and I turn to Mary to bring me back. Praying for her intercession and turning to her as my mother always lights a spark inside that brings me right back to Christ. I could be in tears praying to Our Mother for help and those feelings of inadequacy or self-doubt just start to melt away. It literally feels like I’m curled up in my mom’s lap on the couch. It’s moments like these that I find so important to turn to Mary. Mary gets it. She’s been there. She can relate and empathize with our struggles.

During daily mass one day, I lost myself to my thoughts as I began to feel totally overwhelmed by life’s tribulations and suddenly I look up to see the priest hold up the large host and say “Take this all of you, and eat of it, for this is My Body, which will be given up for you.” After hearing these words for probably the thousandth time in my life, my complaints seemed so insignificant. My struggle paled in comparison to the suffering Christ would endure for us on the cross. I imagine this is how Mary felt every day of her life, giving it completely and freely to God. She experienced extreme suffering and sorrow as she stood at the foot of the cross and watched her own beloved Son be tortured and crucified; yet, she didn’t let this event tarnish her faith in the Lord, but strengthen it. She allowed her sufferings to merit grace for the good of saving our souls.

Saint John Paul II wrote in Salvifici Dolores, his apostolic letter on the meaning of human suffering, “For suffering cannot be transformed and changed by a grace from outside, but from within. And Christ through his own salvific suffering is very much present in every human suffering, and can act from within that suffering by the powers of his Spirit of truth, his consoling Spirit.” Suffering is a feeling of pain, whether it be emotional, mental, or physical. It cant be changed by anything other than God acting within us and through us. Mary allowed God to act in her own pain and unite us all in His consoling Spirit and in turn she is filled with this same Spirit in consoling us as our mother. It is in this same document, that Saint JPII writes of the Divine Redeemer wishing use the heart of His Mother to unite each and every one of us to Christ on the cross. It is truly through her that we are able to be united with him in suffering and allow God to bring about the good that will come from our suffering. It’s through Mary that we are made true brothers and sisters in Christ.

Mary’s virtues of faith, hope, and love, humility and obedience, and desire to bring us to closer to Christ can fuel our faith every day as long as we follow the radiant Morning Star. It is in turning to her, as our mother, for guidance that we are given a tiny glimpse into the glory of God and the love that He gives us. Inspired by Mary’s Immaculate Heart and imitating her love for her children we are given the chance to be filled with an overwhelming joy that we might kneel before Christ offering up not just our gifts, but also our sufferings – allowing Him to work within us, transforming our hearts to love as His mother does.

Delivering the Fullness of Faith

At formation meetings we are winding down a six part series on the process of evangelization. The foundation for this series was laid in August with a presentation on “The Mission of the Church.” It gave an overview and introduction to the process of evangelization according to the mind of the Church.

The subsequent sessions are focusing on a particular stage in the process of evangelization and drawing out, on a practical level, what these different essential moments look like in youth and campus ministry today.FID

Much of what will be covered during this series will be supplemented by reading Sherry Weddell’s book Forming Intentional Disciples. As the upcoming topic for each month is introduced we will note sections from this book that correspond with the topic.

This month’s formation entitled “Delivering the Fullness of Faith” will be presented by our brother Mike Filamor. In preparation for this meeting on January 24, 2017 we encourage everyone to read this selection from Catechesi Tradendae. We will begin with Mass and Evening Prayer at 7:30pm.

The full list of topics in the series are as follows:
1. The Mission of the Church (Overview)
2. Relational Ministry and Building Trust with Teens (Pre-evangelization)
3. Apologetics (Pre-evangelization)
4. Proclamation of the Gospel through Personal Testimony (Evangelization)
5. Delivering the Fullness of the Faith (Catechesis)
6. Accompanying Teens in Prayer, Charity, and Evangelization (Discipleship)

Post-meeting update (1/30/17): The presentation from this formation night is available for download in PowerPoint or as a pdf. Mike both showed how catechesis is an essential moment in the process of evangelization and more practically how to determine the essential components of teaching a particular doctrine. The Association for Catechumenal Ministry has a great blog that recaps this process and is a helpful starting place for determining what to teach and some examples.

Building a Community of Love

By: Krysti Patient

The first weekend of December, Girls’ Catholic Life Communities from 5 different parishes in the diocese traveled out to West Virginia to go on their annual retreat. Four sisters of Women Youth Apostles were among the adult moderators there to lead and accompany the girls on this grace-filled weekend which fell in with the diocesan youth ministry theme for this year “I will love”.

I had the great privilege of giving the last talk of the retreat to the CLC girls on Sunday morning. All weekend the girls had been hearing about different aspects of Love, beginning with God’s love for us, and moving to our love for others, a sacrificial Christ-like love, and a love for God himself in the Spiritual Life through deep prayer. The last piece of the puzzle, my talk on “building a community of love” served to show the girls how all of this was meant to be lived out in community, and in particular, the Catholic Life Community they have each been called to.

No room for fear

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photo by Catie LeBouton

I have always found that fear has no place in community. I gave the girls a personal example of my first experience with a faith community while at college, and how my first challenge as a new member of that community was to rid myself of any and all fears. That meant no fear of embarrassment, no fear of rejection, no fear of comparison.  These are big obstacles to young people, and these are conquered only by the power of the Holy Spirit working in community. A community is a place of belonging, a place of love. Scripture tells us “There is no fear in love, but perfect love drives out fear because fear has to do with punishment, and so one who fears is not yet perfect in love” (1 John 4:18)

The power of going on retreat is pretty amazing. I’m not sure I’ll ever tire of watching young people cast away their fears one by one as they immerse themselves into community, replacing those insecurities and hesitations with bold love and acceptance, growing more perfectly in love for themselves, their Lord, and for one another.

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photo by Catie LeBouton

Given to one another

I started my talk with the universal call to holiness and community in The Church that Christ himself established for the purpose of carrying on his saving work of love. This was for the girls to know the true normalcy for each one of us to find our place in The Church and to build that Community here on earth. I believe that in the course of the retreat, as they cast away fear and put on love, part of that beauty and really building that community there for the weekend (and beyond) is also in casting away what we think we know, what sin and doubt and fear have taught us- that it is not normal to long for Heaven. Not normal that we should love our God. Not normal that we should strive for holiness. Not so! In CLC, and on retreat especially, we get to watch these teen girls slowly regain or grow in their ability to see truth, which is that we were made for love, made for God, and made for Heaven- how then, could these longings not be normal?

In Girls’ Catholic Life Community, high school girls make commitments to one another. Community is a place of belonging, and though there are adult moderators to lead and guide, the teens do not belong to the moderators or the moderators to the teens—rather, each member of the community belongs to one another. So many young Catholics grow up in The Church and parish community, but in reaching adulthood fall away. Modern societal messages tell our young people that they need not commit themselves to anything or anyone. CLC provides these teen girls the chance to seek the truths of their faith and to take ownership of it. There are varying levels of membership promises to provide the girls the chance to commit themselves to their faith and to do so with their peers in common. In this communion with one another as sisters of CLC, they live out their commitments in openness, honesty, prayer, and in frequent receiving of the Sacraments.

The girls that feel a call to CLC have a desire to go deeper. They have sensed that there is a greater longing of their unsatisfied hearts and they have sought to know more, to love more. They have sensed their power and their purpose- to be saints, to help one another in this mission, and to love one another towards heaven.

A Reflection on the 3rd Week of Advent

By: Kelly Power

I absolutely love Christmas music this time of year (and yes, I listen all the way from the beginning of Advent to The Epiphany!). Although as I sing the lyrics of these songs on my way to school to drop off the kids or have them as background while we play and decorate, I cannot help but feel that they are doing a disservice to my Advent preparations. Are they helping me to enter in to the REAL Christmas story and encounter the REAL Christ child? These are the lyrics I hear…

“Silent Night, Holy Night, all is calm all is bright” and “All is merry and bright,”

“The baby awakes, no crying he makes” and “O Little town of Bethlehem, how still we see thee lie,”

“Tis the season to be jolly,” and “Children laughing, people passing meeting smile after smile,”

All these carols we hear repeatedly throughout Advent are supposed to illustrate the true feelings and images of Christmas. Right? A Christmas that is quiet, jolly, still, peaceful, joyful and frankly perfect. So this is what we all strive for during the holidays.

But as I was praying recently and reflecting on the REAL Advent – Mary pregnant and unmarried, journeying by donkey to Bethlehem to ultimately give birth in a stable, and Elizabeth pregnant and though happy, was very old and I am sure facing challenges from both her age and judgments of others. It hit me as two of my babies were crying, one had a dirty diaper, and I was trying desperately to create the perfect peace and joy-filled Advent experience for them that I was probably experiencing many of the REAL feelings of the biblical Advent that of Mary and Elizabeth. The REAL Advent was full of worry, is was messy, it was smelly, it was loud and far from “all merry and bright.” As someone who just experienced pregnancy and birth and is currently caring for a newborn, Jesus probably cried when he woke up and the stables were loud and smelly, not calm and bright, and certainly not silent at night.

I have been looking a lot at miracles this and how God brought about these miracles – the root of Jesse, the birth of John the Baptist and Jesus. He makes possible from the impossible. Mary and Elizabeth experience these Christmas miracles not in the midst of perfect peace, or joy, but Jesus comes in the chaos, the worry, and the mess. “Prepare ye the way,” is a phrase we hear often in Advent, though I began to realize this Advent that as I was getting frustrated, trying to prepare a quiet and perfect Christmas like the ones I hear in the songs for my family, that I was actually missing the miracles – the joy that God was already doing in the midst of my crazy, messy, not so silent nights.

So I am embracing the chaos, the mess, the imperfection and looking for the miracles, the grace, and the joy God is already bringing despite any preparation I may do. He is already here, the REAL Christ child. He brings the Peace, as the Prince of Peace, not me, and He brings the Joy, a joy that cannot be shaken by even the biggest tantrums or my own foiled plans. What all the characters of Christmas knew, whatever their state in life – Mary full of Grace or the rough life of a Shepherd – was that whoever this baby was He was special and they needed Him in their lives just as we all do right now.

So let us not lose sight as we prepare for the coming of our Lord, that He might be right in front of us! He is the only REAL thing we need this season! He is the only one who can bring us the REAL Peace and Joy we desire in our lives and the lives of our families.

Come, Lord Jesus, Come!

Proclamation of the Gospel Through Personal Testimony

At formation meetings we are halfway through a six part series on the process of evangelization. The foundation for this series was laid in August with a presentation on “The Mission of the Church.” It gave an overview and introduction to the process of evangelization according to the mind of the Church.

The subsequent sessions are focusing on a particular stage in the process of evangelization and drawing out, on a practical level, what these different essential moments look like in youth and campus ministry today.FID

Much of what will be covered during this series will be supplemented by reading Sherry Weddell’s book Forming Intentional Disciples. As the upcoming topic for each month is introduced we will note sections from this book that correspond with the topic.

December’s formation night is entitled “Proclamation of the Gospel Through Personal Testimony.” In preparation for this meeting on December 20, 2016 we encourage everyone to read Ch. 8-10 from Forming Intentional Disciples. Please note: due to unforeseen conflicts there will not be Mass at this meeting. We will begin with Evening Prayer at 7:30pm on Tuesday, December 20th.

The full list of topics in the series are as follows:
1. The Mission of the Church (Overview)
2. Relational Ministry and Building Trust with Teens (Pre-evangelization)
3. Apologetics (Pre-evangelization)
4. Proclamation of the Gospel through Personal Testimony (Evangelization)
5. Delivering the Fullness of the Faith (Catechesis)
6. Accompanying Teens in Prayer, Charity, and Evangelization (Discipleship)

Ultimate Outing/RALLY 2016 – I Will Love

By: Krysti Patient

camp-st-charles-journaling

This past weekend, 6:00AM Saturday morning, I drove out to “The Ultimate Outing”, with All Saints and Holy Trinity Catholic Churches. The Ultimate Outing begins with a retreat and ends at Diocesan RALLY. Like perhaps most working adults, my initial expectations were leaning towards a more negative perspective- I was going to be up early, go to bed late, and in the meantime be totally energized, friendly and relational with 40+ teenagers who would undoubtedly be representing the whole spectrum of willingness to participate in the retreat. I knew it wouldn’t be terrible! I simply braced myself to experience all of the challenging parts I’ve become familiar with at youth ministry events and retreats chock-full of talks, small groups and activities. After a particularly busy week (well, month) at the office, I thought, “there won’t be enough coffee in the world to sustain me this weekend!”

rope-swing-krysti-lisbethThankfully, the Holy Spirit is an excellent caffeinator. I had forgotten that the last retreat I went on with teens was a Confirmation retreat-which I remembered fondly, but perhaps was more aware of the mandatory nature of that particular weekend. As a result, I was surprised right off the bat to find many of the teens I encountered at The Ultimate Outing were very open to whatever the weekend held in store. Even if some weren’t totally jumping up and down with excitement, there was a really beautiful surrender that wasn’t a “giving up” but rather a “giving in.”

From the beginning of retreat we introduced journaling as a form of prayer, and encouraged them to journal in places of quiet throughout the retreat, before coming back together in their small groups to share what God was revealing to them all. Throughout the retreat, I was pleased to find that every teen I spoke to was filling their small journal in those quiet moments of prayer. There was even a teen in my small group-who I had thought was fairly disengaged because she would doodle or write in her journal while the rest of the group shared-that later shared with me that journaling was the only way she found that would let her focus and really listen to what others, and also to what God, was saying. She told me she didn’t know journaling was a real form of prayer, or that anyone else prayed the way she did. I could tell this was a big deal for her.

campstcharles-group-photo-2016

Later, in Eucharistic Adoration, several more teens who I may have mentally flagged early on as more difficult to reach, seemed to have the most impactful experience of the group when before Christ in the monstrance. Almost every single teen received the Sacrament of Reconciliation that evening. I wrote in my own journal my thanksgiving to Jesus for the gift of their vulnerability, “These young people are braver than most adults I know. Your kingdom truly does belong to such as these.”

kevin-bohli-rally-welcome-messageThat Sunday morning, we had one last talk and journaling exercise before packing up and heading out to Bishop O’Connell High School for RALLY. When gathered together to hear the welcome message, we received an introduction to this year’s youth ministry theme, and a keynote message from speaker Sean Forrest. The youth ministry theme comes from one of The Church’s newest saints-Mother Teresa of Calcutta. “I will love” is a mission statement, a call to make a firm resolution based on Jesus’ sacrificial love. As he spoke about his first experience serving the poor in Haiti, one line from Sean’s keynote stood out. He said, “I was more exhausted than I ever remember having been. That was because I gave all of myself, in love, to those who needed it.”

“And so today, when we have gathered here together, let us carry in our hearts one strong resolution: I will love. I will be a carrier of God’s love. For that is what Jesus came to teach us: how to love one another.” – Saint Teresa of Calcutta in her address to the United Nations on October 26, 1985

Two workshops, inflatables, Sunday Mass with Bishop Loverde, bacon pizza, and a photo booth photoshoot later, RALLY concluded with a concert and Eucharistic Adoration. I watched my teens gather now with hundreds of other young Catholics to adore Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, and could see that the retrerally-eucharistic-processionat the day before helped them prepare for a beautiful encounter with their Lord. Most of my teens asked me if we could position ourselves as close to where Jesus would be as possible. In watching each of them give their undivided attention to Our Lord-their love for Him was tangible.

The final time in adoration was everything I needed to see that any extra effort or sacrifice on my own part from the weekend was worth it. I was exhausted, more than I had been in a while. In that moment, I too was glad “because I gave all of myself in love to those who needed it.” This is the true power of this year’s theme, this mission statement “I will love.”

Jesus came to teach us this and He is teaching me this still each day…how to love. There are a lot of things that make loving others difficult. However, if all I had to lose was a little sleep or a little of my time, I will give it all again in a heartbeat for one fraction of that moment with young people in Eucharistic Adoration-the teens knowing they are loved by Christ and watching them respond in love.

Apologetics

During formation meetings we are in the midst of a six part series on the process of evangelization. The foundation for this series was laid in August with a presentation on “The Mission of the Church.” It gave an overview and introduction to the process of evangelization according to the mind of the Church.

The other five sessions will focus in particular on each of the stages in the process of evangelization. And we will draw out, on a practical level, what these different essential moments look like in youth and campus ministry today.FID

Much of what will be covered during this series would be supplemented by reading Sherry Weddell’s book Forming Intentional Disciples. As the upcoming topic for each month is introduced we will note sections from this book that correspond with the topic.

The topic for October’s formation meeting is “Apologetics.” This will be the second night we spend on the stage of pre-evangelization, which encompasses everything prior to proclamation of the Gospel. In preparation for this meeting on October 25, 2016 we encourage everyone to read Ch. 6-7 from Forming Intentional Disciples.

The full list of topics in the series are as follows:
1. The Mission of the Church (Overview)
2. Relational Ministry and Building Trust with Teens (Pre-evangelization)
3. Apologetics (Pre-evangelization)
4. Proclamation of the Gospel through personal testimony (Evangelization)
5. Delivering the Fullness of the Faith (Catechesis)
6. Accompanying Teens in Prayer, Charity, and Evangelization (Discipleship)

Post-meeting update (10/28/16): After brief introductory remarks we broke into small groups to spend time talking through ways to handle three typical questions. These discussions bore a lot of fruit in helping us stretch to consider different perspectives or beliefs people may have that would lead to the particular question. There were scenarios in  which simply offering different facts or truths could be seen as a help and others that seemed to required more awareness and understanding before heading down a specific path to answer the proposed question.

There are many questions we could have used but the three we spent time unpacking how to address were:

  • Why do Catholics confess their sins to a priest?
  • How do you know God is real?
  • Why does the Church hate gay people?

It was interesting to see how often the discussion steered itself back to an answer to these questions beginning with another question, one that could engage the questioner and hopefully lead to mutual understanding. Ultimately addressing people’s questions is a craft that requires both content and interpersonal insight. This night was a chance to grow in both areas. And we handed out a streamlined listing of these apologetics resources from the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology anyone who wanted to strengthen their knowledge to answer these or many other common question about the Faith.

Relational Ministry and Building Trust with Teens

Over the next couple months during formation meetings we will be taking a deeper look at the process of evangelization. The foundation for this series was laid in August with a presentation on “The Mission of the Church.” It gave an overview and introduction to the process of evangelization according to the mind of the Church.

In upcoming sessions we will focus in particular on each of the stages in the process of evangelization. And we will draw out, on a practical level, what these different essential moments look like in youth and campus ministry today.FID

Much of what will be covered during this series would be supplemented by reading Sherry Weddell’s book Forming Intentional Disciples. As the upcoming topic for each month is introduced we will note sections from this book that correspond with the topic.

The topic for September’s formation meeting is “Relational Ministry and Building Trust with Teens.” This will be one of two nights that we will spend on pre-evangelization, which encompasses everything prior to proclamation of the Gospel. In preparation for this meeting on September 27, 2016 we encourage everyone to read Ch. 5 from Forming Intentional Disciples.

The full list of topics in the series are as follows:
1. The Mission of the Church (Overview)
2. Relational Ministry and Building Trust with Teens (Pre-evangelization)
3. Apologetics (Pre-evangelization)
4. Proclamation of the Gospel through personal testimony (Evangelization)
5. Delivering the Fullness of the Faith (Catechesis)
6. Accompanying Teens in Prayer, Charity, and Evangelization (Discipleship)